Tag Archives: Adbar

Last 3 days – Robel Temesgen art show in London

Only 2 days left to see the exhibition “Adbar”, paintings by Ethiopian artist Robel Temesgen in his first solo exhibition in UK. It comprises a series of new paintings and works on paper inspired by the longstanding Ethiopian belief of adbar and its associated rituals. Art is a great way for students of Amharic to learn more about the culture and messages of the language.
The Amharic term “adbar” refers to the embodiment of protective spirits within various elements of the natural landscape, such as lakes, mountains, rocks or trees. Trees possessing adbar, for instance, are strictly protected and believed to act as a link between people and the spirit world. They can serve as shelter,
places of worship and meeting points around which to discuss community matters. Temesgen grew up in Dessie, north-east Ethiopia, where adbar was commonly practised.
The series includes over 20 works depicting shimmering imaginary landscapes in Temesgen’s characteristic symbolic, lyrical style. The works vary greatly in scale, with the largest paintings measuring over 5 metres in length. Suspended from the ceiling and presented as floating rolls of paper partially covering the floor, their appearance recalls Chinese scroll paintings or Ethiopian healing scrolls.
Robel Temesgen was born in 1987 in Ethiopia, received an MFA from Tromsø Academy of Contemporary Art, University of Tromsø, Norway in 2015, and a BFA with high distinction in Fine Art (Painting) from Addis Ababa University in 2010. He currently lives and works in Addis Ababa.
More information can be found on the Tiwani Contemporary website

From website www.tiwani.co.uk
From website www.tiwani.co.uk
.
The exhibition is at the Tiwani Contemporary Gallery (16 Little Portland Street, London, W1W 8BP) and is open Tuesday – Friday 11:00am-6:00pm, Saturday 12:00am-5:00pm. Admission Free.
Shared from the Alertlist of The Anglo-Ethiopian Society, a great resource for people wishing to learn Amharic in London or follow Ethiopian events.